Constellations

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The constellations are ordered according to their Latin names. I added the Saints with the respective Cloths for further reference and the names of the stars, if available. "Alpha And (Alpheratz/Sirrah)" means "the star Alpha Andromedae has the name Alpheratz or Sirrah". There are several stars with the same names - these are not necessarily typograpical errors!

Contents

88 Modern Constellations

Andromeda

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Phoenicia, assimilated by the Greeks (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha And (Alpheratz/Sirrah), Beta And (Mirach), Gamma And (Alamak)
  • Info: Andromeda contains the Andromeda Galaxy (M31/NGC224), which is the nearest spiral galaxy to our own galaxy and the largest object of the Local Group of galaxies.

Antlia (Air Pump)

  • This constellation have been reported by Masami Kurumada to not be of the 88 constellations in Saint Seiya due to being too modern.
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Can be seen in Middle Europe only during late winter and early spring. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Apus (Bird of Paradise)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright.

Aquarius (Water Bearer)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Aqr (Sadalmelik), Beta Aqr (Sadalsuud), Gamma Aqr (Sadachbia), Delta Aqr (Scheat), Epsilon Aqr (Albali)
  • Info: Aquarius is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Aquila (Eagle)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Aql (Atair/Altair), Beta Aql (Alshain/Alschain), Gamma Aql (Tarazet), Delta Aql (Deneb Okab), Zeta Aql (Deneb el Okab)
  • Info:

Ara (Altar)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus). It was probably originally named by the Greek philosopher Eudoxos in 400 BC
  • Named stars:
  • Info:

Aries (Ram)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Ari (Hamal/Elnath), Beta Ari (Elscheratain/Scheratan), Gamma Ari (Mesarthim/Mesartun), Delta Ari (Botein)
  • Info: Aries is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Auriga (Charioteer)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Aur (Capella/Alhajot), Beta Aur (Menkalinam)
  • Info:

Boötes (Bear Watcher/Ox Driver)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus, already mentioned in Homer)
  • Named stars: Alpha Boo (Arctur/Arkturus), Beta Boo (Nekbar), Gamma Boo (Ceginus), Epsilon Boo (Mirak), Eta Boo (Muphrid), Mu Boo (Alkalurops)
  • Info:

Caelum (Graving Tool)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Can be seen in Middle Europe partly only during late autumn and winter. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Camelopardalis (Giraffe)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1661, Bartsch
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Circumpolar constellation without mythological background. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Cancer (Crab)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Can (Acubens/Sertan), Beta Can (Al Tarf)
  • Info: Cancer is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year). This constellation contains the star cluster Praesepe (arab: Meleph)

Canes Venatici (Hunting Dogs)

  • Origin of the constellation: 17th century, Hevelius
  • Named stars: Alpha CVn (Cor Caroli)
  • Info: This constellation was introduced by Hevelius to fill the empty spots in the Ptolemaean star catalogue. It consisted of a southern and a northern hunting dog; the northern dog was named Asterion by Hevelius.

Canis Maior (Big Dog)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha CMa (Sirius/Alhabor), Beta CMa (Mirzam), Gamma CMa (Muliphein), Delta CMa (Wezen), Epsilon CMa (Adhara), Zeta CMa (Phurud/Aludra)
  • Info:

Canis Minor (Small Dog)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha CMi (Prokyon/Elgomaisa), Beta CMi (Mirzam)
  • Info:

Capricornus (Sea Goat)

  • Gold Saints Capricorn Shura, El Cid (Lost Canvas), Izo (Next Dimension)
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Babylon, assimilated by the Greeks (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Cap (Algedi/Dabih), Beta Cap (Sadalzabih), Gamma Cap (Deneb Algedi/Naschira), Delta Cap (Deneb Algedi/Naschira)
  • Info: Capricornus is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Carina (Keel, formerly Argo Navis)

  • Corona Saint Carina Atlas (Movie3)
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus) - as Argo Navis! In 1752, Lacaille separated the huge ship into three smaller constellations, Carina being one of them.
  • Named stars: Alpha Car (Canopus), Beta Car (Miaplacidus), Epsilon Car (Avior), Iota Car (Tureis)
  • Info:

Cassiopeia

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Cas (Schedir), Beta Cas (Caph/Cheph), Delta Cas (Ruchbar)
  • Info:

Centaurus (Centaur)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Cen (Toliman/Rigil Kentaurus), Beta Cen (Agena/Hadar), Gamma Cen (Muliphein), Theta Cen (Menkent)
  • Info:

Cepheus

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Cep (Alderamin), Beta Cep (Alfirk), Gamma Cep (Errai/Arrai), Mu Cep (Granatstern)
  • Info:

Cetus (Whale)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Cet (Menkar/Menkab), Beta Cet (Deneb Kaitos/Diphda), Zeta Cet (Baten Kaitos), Omicron Cet (Mira)
  • Info:

Chamaeleon

  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation was first mentioned in Bayer's Uranometria. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Circinus (Compass)

  • This constellation have been reported by Masami Kurumada to not be of the 88 constellations in Saint Seiya due to being too modern.
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation is located in the vicinity of Alpha Cen. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Columba (Dove)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars: Alpha Col (Phakt)
  • Info: This dove is allegedly the dove that Noah sent out to discern whether the Flood was over. Can be seen in Middle Europe partly only during winter.

Coma Berenices (Berenice's Hair)

  • Origin of the constellation: 16th century, Tycho Brahe
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation is named for the Phoenician princess Berenike who sacrificed her golden hair to the Gods to help her army win a war. The sacrifice was accepted, the hair turned to stars in the sky. None of the stars is particularly bright, but the constellation contains a large amount of galaxies (Coma Cluster).

Corona Australis (Southern Crown)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Can be seen in South Europe partly only during late summer. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Corona Borealis (Northern Crown)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha CrB (Gemma/Alphekka)
  • Info:

Corvus (Raven)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Crv (Alchiba), Beta Crv (Kraz), Gamma Crv (Gienah), Delta Crv (Algorab), Epsilon Crv (Minkar)
  • Info:

Crater (Cup)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Crt (Alkres)
  • Info:

Crux (Southern Cross)

  • Ghost (Silver?) Saint Christ (Movie1)
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars: Alpha Cru (Acrux), Beta Crux (Becrux), Gamma Crux (Gacrux)
  • Info: A small constellation that contains bright stars and a lot of star clusters.

Cygnus (Swan/Northern Cross)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Cyg (Deneb), Beta Cyg (Albireo), Gamma Cyg (Schedir/Sadr),
  • Info:

Delphinus (Dolphin)

  • No Saint given; possibly one of Ghost Saint Geist's Minions (Anime)
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars:
  • Info:

Dorado (Goldfish)

  • No Saint given; possibly constellation of the Steel Saint Sea Cloth Ushio (Anime)
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation was first mentioned in Bayer's Uranometria. It can't be viewed from Middle Europe. None of the stars is particularly bright, but you can find the Large Magellanic Cloud here.

Draco (Dragon)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Dra (Thuban), Gamma Dra (Eltanin), Delta Dra (Al Tais)
  • Info:

Equuleus (Little Horse)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Babylonia
  • Named stars: Alpha Equ (Kitalphar/Kitel Phard)
  • Info:

Eridanus

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Eri (Achernar), Beta Eri (Cursa), Gamma Eri (Zaurak), Theta Eri (Acamar)
  • Info:

Fornax (Furnace)

  • Origin of the constellation: 18th century, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Can be seen in Middle Europe only during late autumn and early winter. None of the stars is particularly bright, but here you can find the Fornax star system, one of the closest galaxies.

Gemini (Twins)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Gem (Castor), Beta Gem (Pollux), Gamma Gem (Alhena), Delta Gem (Wasat), Zeta Gem (Mekbuda), Eta Gem (Tejat)
  • Info: Gemini is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Grus (Crane)

  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars: Alpha Gru (Alnair)
  • Info: Only the northern parts of the constellation can be seen in Middle Europe during August/September.

Hercules

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Her (Ras Algethi), Lambda Her (Maasym)
  • Info:

Horologium (Clock)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation can't be viewed from Middle Europe. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Hydra (Sea Serpent)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Hya (Alphard), Sigma Hya (Minchir)
  • Info:

Hydrus (Water Snake)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This snake is male, contrary to the other water snake that can be seen from Middle Europe.

Indus (Indian)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation was named for the native Americans whom Bayer thought to be threatened by the white settlers, and thus he wanted to put them into the sky forever. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Lacerta (Lizard)

  • Origin of the constellation: 1690, Hevelius
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Almost completely circumpolar constellation without mythological background. None of the stars is particularly bright; they didn't even get Greek letters.

Leo (Lion)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Babylonia, one of the oldest known constellations (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Leo (Regulus), Beta Leo (Denebola), Gamma Leo (Algieba), Delta Leo (Duhr), Epsilon Leo (Ras Elased Australis), Zeta Leo (Aldhafera), Mu Leo (Ras Elased Borealis), Omicron Leo (Subra)
  • Info: Leo is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Leo Minor (Small Lion)

  • Bronze Saint Lionet Ban
  • Origin of the constellation: 17th century, Hevelius
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright.

Lepus (Hare)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Lep (Elarneb/Arneb), Beta Lep (Nihal)
  • Info:

Libra (Scales)

  • Origin of the constellation: This constellation originated in Sumer as "scale of the sky". In Babylon and Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus), the Libra stars were considered the claws of the Scorpion, which one can also see in the names of the main stars. The modern name Libra was given the constellation by the Romans around 100 AD.
  • Named stars: Alpha Lib (Zuben Elgenubi = Southern Claw), Beta Lib (Zuben Elschemali = Northern Claw), Gamma Lib (Zuben Elakrab = Scorpion's Claw), Delta Lib (Zuben Elakribi = Scorpion's Claw)
  • Info: Libra is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Lupus (Wolf)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece
  • Named stars:
  • Info:

Lynx

  • Corona Saint Jaoh (Movie3), Bronze Saint Retsu (Episode G)
  • Origin of the constellation: 17th century, Hevelius
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Almost completely circumpolar constellation. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Lyra (Harp)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Lyr (Wega), Beta Lyr (Sheliak)
  • Info:

Mensa (Table Mountain)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright, but a small part of the Large Magellanic Cloud reaches into the constellation.

Microscopium (Microscope)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Can be seen in Middle Europe partly only during late summer. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Monoceros (Unicorn)

  • Origin of the constellation: 17th century, Bartsch
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright.

Musca (Fly)

  • Silver Saint Dio
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright.

Norma (Level)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 18th century, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright.

Octans (Octant)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellations is located in the area of the Southern pole of the sky. Sigma Oct is the (albeit weak) star that's closest to be the Southern polar star.

Ophiuchus (Snake Bearer)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Oph (Ras Alhague), Beta Oph (Celbalrai), Delta Oph (Yed), Epsilon Oph (Yed), Eta Oph (Sabik)
  • Info: Ophiuchus is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year). Contrary to the other 12 it is not considered an astrological sign, though.

Orion

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Ori (Beteigeuze/Betelgeuse), Beta Ori (Rigel), Gamma Ori (Bellatrix), Delta Ori (Mintaka), Epsilon Ori (Alnilam), Zeta Ori (Alnitak)
  • Info:

Pavo (Peacock)

  • Silver Saint Shiva (Anime)
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars: Alpha Pav (Peacock)
  • Info: This constellation is located in the vicinity of the Southern pole of the sky.

Pegasus

  • Bronze Saints Seiya, Tenma (Lost Canvas, Next Dimension)
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Peg (Markab), Beta Peg (Scheat), Gamma Peg (Algenib), Epsilon Peg (Enif), Zeta Peg (Homam)
  • Info:

Perseus

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Per (Algenib/Mirfak), Beta Per (Algol),
  • Info:

Phoenix

  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars: Alpha Phe (Ankaa)
  • Info: This constellation is named for the Egyptian myth of the Phoenix, who burns himself every 500 years to emerge rejuvenated from the ashes.

Pictor (Easel)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille / 1877, Gould
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright.

Pisces (Fishes)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Psc (Alrescha/El Rischa),
  • Info: Pisces is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Piscis Austrinus (Southern Fish)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha PsA (Fomalhaut/Diphda)
  • Info:

Puppis (Stern, formerly Argo Navis)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus) - as Argo Navis! In 1752, Lacaille separated the huge ship into three smaller constellations, Puppis being one of them.
  • Named stars: Zeta Pup (Naos), Rho Pup (Tureis)
  • Info:

Pyxis (Mariner's Compass)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille. This constellation was named as addition to the ship Argo Navis (or rather the parts of it that are left now). Its stars were formerly called the star pattern Malus (Mast) as part of Argo Navis; Pyxis itself is not considered a part of the former Argo Navis though.
  • Named stars:
  • Info: It can be seen in Middle Europe only during late winter. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Reticulum (Net)

  • No Saint given; possibly constellation of the Silver Saint Arachne
  • Origin of the constellation: 1624, Bartsch / 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: The net which gave this constellation its name is the crosshairs in the telescope.

Sagitta (Arrow)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Sge (Sham)
  • Info:

Sagittarius (Archer)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Sgr (Rukbat), Gamma Sgr (Alnasi), Delta Sgr (Kaus), Epsilon Sgr (Kaus), Lambda Sgr (Kaus), Omicron Sgr (Nunki)
  • Info: Sagittarius is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Scorpius (Scorpion)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Sco (Antares/Calbalakrab), Beta Sco (Akrab), Lambda Sco (Shaula)
  • Info: Scorpius is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year).

Sculptor (Sculptor's Tools)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: Can be seen in Middle Europe only during autumn. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Scutum (Shield)

  • Ghost Saint Tateza Yan (Movie1)
  • Origin of the constellation: 1690, Hevelius
  • Named stars:
  • Info: The Shield of Sobieski was turned into a constellation to memorize the liberation of Vienna from the Turkish siege. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Serpens [Caput+Cauda] (Serpent [Head+Tail])

  • No Saint given; possibly one of Ghost Saint Geist's Minions (Anime)
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece
  • Named stars: Alpha Ser (Unuk Elhaija), Theta Ser (Alya)
  • Info:

Sextans (Sextant)

  • Bronze Saint Yulij (Gigantomachia)
  • Origin of the constellation: 17th century, Hevelius
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation was named as addition to the ship Argo Navis (or rather the parts of it that are left now). None of the stars is particularly bright.

Taurus (Bull)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Tau (Aldebaran), Beta Tau (Elnath), Eta Tau (Alkyone, main star of the Pleiades)
  • Info: Taurus is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year). This constellation contains the star clusters Pleiades and Hyades.

Telescopium (Telescope)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1752, Lacaille
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation was named by Lacaille to memorize his favourite tool. None of the stars is particularly bright.

Triangulum [Borealis] ([Northern] Triangle)

  • Bronze Saint Noesis (Episode G)
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Egypt, assimilated by the Greeks (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Tri (Mothallah)
  • Info: This constellation contains the beautiful Sc spiral galaxy M33/NGC598

Triangulum Australe (Southern Triangle)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars: Alpha TrA (Atria)
  • Info: Nothing of importance...

Tucana (Toucan)

  • No Saint given; possibly constellation of the Steel Saint Sky Cloth Sho (Anime)
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars:
  • Info: This constellation contains the Small Magellanic Cloud.

Ursa Maior (Big Bear)

  • Bronze Saint Bear Geki
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha UMa (Dubhe), Beta UMa (Merak), Gamma UMa (Pháchd/Phekda), Delta UMa (Megrez), Epsilon UMa (Alioth), Zeta UMa (twin star Alkor+Mizar), Eta (Benetnasch/Alkaid).
  • Info: Ursa Maior also played a role in the Asgard chapter, where Polaris Hilda's God Warriors wore robes according to the main stars of the constellation: Dubhe "Alpha" Siegfried, Merak "Beta" Hagen, Phekda "Gamma" Thor, Megrez "Delta" Alberich, Alioth "Epsilon" Fenrir, Mizar "Zeta" Shido, Alkor "Zeta" Bado, and Benetnasch "Eta" Mime.

Ursa Minor (Small Bear)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Egypt, assimilated by the Greeks (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha UMi (Polaris/Alrukaba), Beta UMi (Kochab), Gamma UMi (Pherkad)
  • Info: Polaris, the brightest star of Ursa Minor, is the North Star or Pole Star, the star closest to the north celestial pole.

Vela (Sails, formerly Argo Navis)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus) - as Argo Navis! In 1752, Lacaille separated the huge ship into three smaller constellations, Vela being one of them.
  • Named stars: Lambda Vel (Suhail)
  • Info: Gamma, Lambda and Delta Velae form the 'false cross' of the south

Virgo (Virgin)

  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus)
  • Named stars: Alpha Vir (Spica/Azimech/Alaazel), Beta Vir (Alaraph), Delta Vir (Minelauva), Epsilon Vir (Almuredin/Vindemiatrix), Zeta Vir (Heze)
  • Info: Virgo is one of the 13 zodiacal constellations (that is, the Sun passes through it in the course of the year). This constellation contains a large number of galaxies (Virgo Cluster).

Volans (Flying Fish)

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: 1603, Bayer
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright.

Vulpecula (Little Fox)

  • Origin of the constellation: 17th century, Bartsch
  • Named stars:
  • Info: None of the stars is particularly bright.


Obsolete Constellations

Argo Navis

  • No Saint given
  • Origin of the constellation: Ancient Greece (Ptolemaeus). It was separated into the constellations Carina (Keel), Puppis (Stern) and Vela (Sails) by Lacaille in 1752.
  • Named stars:
  • Info: The constellations Pyxis (Mariner's Compass) and Sextans (Sextant) were named by Lacaille and Hevelius as additions to the remaining parts of Argo Navis; Pyxis is located in the middle of the former ship, but it isn't considered a part of the classical Argo Navis.

Cerberos

  • Origin: Hevelius originally created this constellation in the 17th century as a three-headed snake held by Hercules. It was not too much later deleted from the star charts again.
  • Named stars: --
  • Info: None of the stars was particularly bright.


The Stars of Ursa Maior

Alpha

  • Name: Dubhe (= "bear")
  • Info:

Beta

  • Name: Merak (= "loin")
  • Info:

Gamma

  • Name: Phekda or Phecda (= "thigh")
  • Info:

Delta

  • Name: Megrez (= "attachment point")
  • Info:

Epsilon

  • Name: Alioth (= "goat")
  • Info: The brightest star of UMa; an αCVn variable

Zeta

  • Name: Mizar (="mantle" or "belt") + Alcor (="humbled one"; called "Little Rider" in German)
  • Info: Zeta UMa is a double star that was often used to test the eyes. Sometimes it's called "Horse and Rider".

Eta

  • Name: Benetnasch (= "wailing women")
  • Info:

Sources

  • brockhaus abc astronomie, Prof.Dr.A.Weigert/Dr.H.Zimmermann, VEB F.A.Brockhaus Verlag, 1973
  • Cambridge Atlas of Astronomy 2nd ed., Jean Andouze/Guy Israel, Cambridge University Press, 1988
  • dtv-Atlas zur Astronomie, Joachim Herrmann, Deutscher Taschenbuch Verlag, 1973
  • Kosmos-Sternführer, David A. Baker, Franckh'sche Verlagsbuchhandlung, 1979
  • Star Myths of the Greek and Romans, Theony Condos, Phanes Press, 1997
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